How much testosterone for female transexuals-Transgender hormone therapy (female-to-male) - Wikipedia

Gender dysphoria; transsexualism; male to female MtF transsexual; female to male FtM transsexual; trans man; trans woman; transman; transwoman. Gender identity disorder is a strong and persistent feeling that a person has the wrong gender identification, which causes discomfort with their sex or a sense of inappropriateness in the gender role of that sex. In addition, a person with this disorder wants to live and be accepted as a member of the opposite sex and change the gender of his or her body as far as possible through surgery and hormone treatment. The underlying cause for gender identity disorder is unknown. In animals, it is known that there are critical periods of time during pregnancy where alterations in the amount of oestrogen and testosterone in the developing animal can permanently alter masculine or feminine behaviour.

How much testosterone for female transexuals

How much testosterone for female transexuals

Tarver; Joy Diane Shaffer 26 April J Sex Marital Ther ; 39 Once absorbed from the Breast expansion manga tracttestosterone is shunted at very high blood levels to the liver where it can cause liver damage albeit very rarely and worsens some of the adverse effects of testosterone, like lower HDL good cholesterol. Andrologia ; 46 If you stop taking testosterone, fat may redistribute towards its original pattern, and muscle mass may gradually decrease. What risks are involved with hormone therapy? Transgender individuals are those with gender identity different from external sexual anatomy at birth. People with gender dysphoria who self-prescribe cross-sex hormones: prevalence, sources, and side effects knowledge. Although hormones are How much testosterone for female transexuals part of a transition process for some, they are not miracle drugs that will turn you into a man or woman. The therapy used resembles hormone replacement regimens used to treat natal men with hypogonadism and most of the preparations are testosterone esters.

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Fashion fit pants crotch according to the Trans Care Projectpeople who are undergoing hormone therapy as part of a transition from male to female MtF should expect to take the How much testosterone for female transexuals estrogen, typically in a pill, a patch or cream applied to the skin, or an injection of estrogen directly into the muscle. It bothered me, because I was driving the car with my wife and kids, and I see a women that is transgender but gorgeous and sexy looking once and looked again, my wife said everything ok, I said yes. It is likely a young t-girl would rather have tea at noon with her friends, while boys may rather playing hot wheels and soccer; your transexual girlfriend may share with you many passion and hobbies more than most genetic girls. I can relate in the other way. Female to Male Surgery Bottom surgery for FtM people is often more expensive, as the surgical procedure is more involved. You can also see all products listed on the store page. Eur J Endocrinol tedtosterone — One day, I decided to liberate myself of all paranoias and date a TS. Because to be honest with I,m still learning about some of this stuff myself. Needles and syringes are very inexpensive and can be bought at fwmale pharmacy or online.

Many transgender men and women seek hormone therapy as part of the transition process.

  • Transgender hormone therapy of the female-to-male FTM type, also known as masculinizing hormone therapy , is a form of hormone therapy and sex reassignment therapy which is used to change the secondary sexual characteristics of transgender people from feminine or androgynous to masculine.
  • When considering your next step to becoming an MTF or male to female transgendered individual,.
  • Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity 20 6 :
  • I know what you are probably thinking, but No!

In transgender men, or trans masculine people FTM , the most common medication used for transition is testosterone. Administration of testosterone via transdermal, intramuscular, subcutaneous, or oral routes lowers serum estradiol levels, raises serum testosterone levels, and results in the development of typical male secondary sex characteristics. Irreversible changes include: deepening of the voice, increase in facial and body hair growth, clitoral enlargement clitoromegaly , and thickened facial bone structure.

Some trans men also describe changes in emotions e. Adverse effects can include elevations in blood pressure, polycythemia, worsening of lipid profile, elevations in glucose, elevations in transaminases, acne, and effects on fertility although testosterone is not an effective contraceptive as it does not interrupt ovulation, so pregnancy can still occur. Finasteride can also be used to prevent male-pattern baldness in transgender men, as it only blocks dihydrotestosterone DHT , not testosterone itself; however this will likely slow or decrease secondary hair growth, and may slow or decrease clitoromegaly as well.

In transgender women or trans feminine people MTF , the most commonly used medications are estrogens and anti-androgens.

Administration of estrogen via oral, sublingual, transdermal, intramuscular, or subcutaneous routes lower serum testosterone levels, raises serum estradiol levels, and results in the development of typical female secondary sex characteristics including: breast growth, softer skin, decreased muscle mass, and female-pattern fat distribution.

These effects are largely reversible. Some trans women also describe changes in emotions e. Adverse effects can include increased risk for thrombosis, elevations in blood pressure, elevations in prolactin rarely including development of a prolactinoma , migraines, elevations in transaminases and effects on fertility although estrogen is not an effective contraceptive. Estrogens will NOT heighten voice pitch, decrease facial hair, change facial bone structure, or reverse male-pattern baldness.

Other methodologies would need to be employed e. Anti-androgens i. These medications block the effects of testosterone, resulting in decreased erectile function and allowing estrogen to develop typical female secondary sex characteristics.

Finasteride, however, specifically targets dihydrotestosterone DHT , not testosterone, so it is not as effective at lowering total testosterone levels. GnRH Agonists i. Lupron could also be used instead of Anti-Androgens to block endogenous testosterone production. Lupron is typically given intramuscularly every couple months and is very effective at blocking total testosterone levels.

However, it can be difficult to obtain insurance coverage for it, and is otherwise fairly expensive out of pocket. Progesterones activate the androgen receptors slightly, so may be used to improve libido and mood. Not all transgender patients will want to take medications for gender transition and the risks, benefits and alternatives should be discussed with each individual along with their personal goals for transition to determine the right course.

Follow In transgender men, or trans masculine people FTM , the most common medication used for transition is testosterone. Have more questions? Submit a request. Please sign in to leave a comment.

Antiestrogens e. According to the Trans Care Project , people who are undergoing hormone therapy as part of a transition from female to male FtM should expect to take the hormone testosterone, typically either in the form of a patch or cream that is applied to the skin or an injection of testosterone directly into the muscle. They ship my orders within 24 hours and provide a tracking number so I always know exactly when I can expect my next bottles. Methandriol bisenanthoyl acetate. What might be the reasons that turn a man attracted to transexual women more than genetic ones? J Sex Med.

How much testosterone for female transexuals

How much testosterone for female transexuals

How much testosterone for female transexuals. The Process of Changing Your Gender

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Gender dysphoria; transsexualism; male to female MtF transsexual; female to male FtM transsexual; trans man; trans woman; transman; transwoman. Gender identity disorder is a strong and persistent feeling that a person has the wrong gender identification, which causes discomfort with their sex or a sense of inappropriateness in the gender role of that sex.

In addition, a person with this disorder wants to live and be accepted as a member of the opposite sex and change the gender of his or her body as far as possible through surgery and hormone treatment. The underlying cause for gender identity disorder is unknown. In animals, it is known that there are critical periods of time during pregnancy where alterations in the amount of oestrogen and testosterone in the developing animal can permanently alter masculine or feminine behaviour.

However, more research is needed to find out if a similar mechanism could be operating in gender identity disorder. Gender identity disorder is the feeling that a person does not belong to the sex in which they were born. In gender identity disorder, the person is unhappy in their present gender role.

These feelings often lead to the wearing of clothes of their desired gender and changing their role in society accordingly. People with gender identity disorder have normal body appearances and hormone levels for their birth gender. It is important to recognise the difference between gender identity disorder, where the person feels they were born in the wrong gender, and disorders of sex development. This term covers a range of conditions present from birth, where the development of one or more components of anatomical, chromosomal or gonadal sex is unusual, but the person generally does not feel they have been born in the wrong gender.

The diagnosis and treatment of gender identity disorder is usually made in accordance with the World Professional Association of Transgender Health guidelines, which recommend that this is done by a mental health practitioner who has experience in working with clients who have problems of gender and sexuality. People with mental health issues can be treated, but they require careful assessment to ensure the gender identity disorder is not related to the underlying mental health issue.

Within the NHS, the route to treatment is for a person to be assessed by local psychiatric services and, if gender identity disorder is present, refer them on to one of the specialist gender identity clinics. Blood tests to rule out any endocrine problems are usually taken before hormone treatment is given and will test levels of luteinising hormone LH , follicle stimulating hormone FSH , testosterone, oestradiol and prolactin in the bloodstream.

Tests will also be taken to make sure it is safe to give hormones, and these include liver function tests, a prostate-specific antigen test and a full blood count. As the person advances through this sequence of therapy with increasingly irreversible effects on their body and therefore, more significant physical alterations , it becomes increasingly difficult to revert to their birth sex.

It is therefore important that hormonal therapy is undertaken in close collaboration with a mental health professional who is experienced in the assessment of people with gender identity disorder, ideally working closely with the endocrinologist to deliver treatment. Following hormonal treatment, surgery is also often used to modify the genitalia and breasts to alter their appearance to that of the desired gender.

After surgery, hormone treatment needs to be continued to prevent the complications of not having sex hormone production such as brittle bones osteoporosis or early heart disease. For transwomen, the standard hormonal treatment used at the major NHS provider clinic is oestradiol valerate. The dose given is usually increased over time after an initial three months of therapy. A gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogue is added to stop testosterone production. To cover the rise in testosterone levels for the first two weeks, cyproterone acetate is also given once daily.

Other treatments can include the use of either ethinylestradiol or premarin. However, these preparations are difficult to measure and put the person at a greater risk of thrombosis of the veins than with the use of oestradiol valerate. For transmen, testosterone treatment begins with a dose of testosterone enanthate esters 4-weekly.

The dose is increased every three to four months, but initial doses are usually adequate to suppress menstruation. The aim of therapy is to achieve testosterone levels in the high normal male range one week after the injection, and to have a lower level at the bottom of the normal male range on the day the next injection is due.

Other regimes include the use of testosterone gel patches or longer-acting preparations such as a long-acting injection or testosterone implants. The aim of therapy is to get the testosterone levels into the normal male range. Although side-effects are relatively rare, there are a number of issues that a person considering treatment should be aware of.

The normal timescale for treatment is that a person has to be living in the opposite gender for a minimum of one year, but more usually two years, before they are eligible for gender reassignment surgery. With regard to long-term outcomes, the mortality rate between the trans and general population is not different, which shows that lifelong hormone replacement therapy in this group is very safe.

The legal rights of transpeople have been recognised in the Gender Recognition Act and the majority of trans people have the right to change their birth certificate when they are stable and established in their new gender role. About Contact Events News. Search Search. You and Your Hormones. Students Teachers Patients Browse. Human body. Home Endocrine conditions Gender identity disorder. Gender identity disorder Gender identity disorder is where a person is deeply unhappy with the gender they were born in, because it is different from the gender they feel they should be.

This often leads to a desire to live in their preferred gender and change their appearance. Relevant terms associated with gender identity disorder Gender dysphoria; transsexualism; male to female MtF transsexual; female to male FtM transsexual; trans man; trans woman; transman; transwoman What is gender identity disorder?

What causes gender identity disorder? What are the signs and symptoms of gender identity disorder? How common is gender identity disorder? Is gender identity disorder inherited? There is no evidence of an inherited cause for gender identity disorder. How is gender identity disorder diagnosed? How is gender identity disorder treated? Are there any side-effects to the treatment? For transwomen, the side-effects can include: Thromboembolic disease deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism — the rate of deep vein thrombosis in transsexual patients is approximately 2.

However, in this young population, this represents a risk that is 20 times greater than that of the general population. The majority of these incidents occur during the first two years of treatment.

After this period, the risk of thromboembolic disease remains, but at a much lower rate 0. Breast cancer — there have only been four case reports of breast tumours occurring in treated transsexual patients, suggesting that the risk of breast cancer following feminising hormone therapy is very low.

In half of these, the abnormalities continue for more than three months. However, the increases are mild and only rarely require discontinuation of treatment. Fertility — oestrogen therapy leads to suppression of sperm production. Men should be counselled that the treatment will reduce their fertility and offered the chance of sperm storage if desired. For transmen, the side-effects can include: Polycythaemia — testosterone replacement can be associated with thickening of the blood polycythaemia and this can lead to an increased risk of stroke in some people.

This can occur even in young people as both stroke and heart attacks have been reported in athletes who abuse testosterone. Abnormal liver function — one set of research has shown short-term increases in liver function enzymes in 4.

This is especially likely to occur when high levels of testosterone replacement are used. Monitoring of the endometrial thickness by ultrasound scanning every two years is recommended. Hysterectomy is often recommended after two years of testosterone therapy. What are the longer-term implications of gender identity disorder? Last reviewed: Mar Prev. Gestational diabetes. Related Glands.

Related Hormones. Related Endocrine Conditions. Related Glossary Supplements.

How much testosterone for female transexuals

How much testosterone for female transexuals